You are currently browsing the monthly archive for July 2014.

It was just too hot yesterday to get much done on the barn. It was 95º and the only flat place to cut the metal siding was in the full sun. In the interest of preserving my  husband from heat stroke. I made him quit.

Starting the Siding

He did get several pieces of the siding on. I washed them last night after it cooled down a bit.

Most of this building is being constructed from leftover materials from our other two big metal pole barns. Some of the metal pieces are pretty icky since they have been lying around for nearly 10 years. A little soap, water, and a broom took care of most of it.

The window was purchased from the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store and originally intended for the Milker Barn. The construction guys neglected to tell me that because the window frame shared the same support beam as the door jamb, I needed tempered glass for that window to pass inspection. Hence the boy’s lovely window.

If you are considering a building project, the Re-Store can be a good place to find items. Remember to take your exact measurements and a tape measure with you. Get all of the specifications for the materials you will need, as they don’t take returns.

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Monday morning Cody had stopped by work and picked up the couple of boards we were missing for the end caps. That guy is going to need to get a pick-up truck one of these days!

Unofficial HD Delivery Vehicle

The crew was caffeinated and blueberry muffinated by the time I left for work.

The Smell of Sawdust in the Morning

As I was leaving they were cutting the spanner pieces for the roof framing. They had also decided to take hints from the construction of the big barn on how the ends and edges have been finished.

Raise the Roof!

When I returned home from work this is what I saw. The roof was on. The door had been built and hung. The window was framed in, and they were just putting on the door handle. Kind of.

They really wanted to use the shed antler we found in the woods, but thought they had better get final approval before they did.

It’s a buck hut. How could I say no?

Door Handle

The construction day started a little later on Sunday and it was interrupted by a few rain delays. An unused water tank works great as a compressor rain hat.

Rain Delay

After the first one it became humid and we lost the breeze for a while. Ugh. At least we managed to stay productive during the time outs. During the first one, the guys fished out the lumber from the rafters of the milker barn for the roof. During the second, we had lunch. By the end of the day they had gotten the walls framed in and the rafters up on the beams. Moving on to the Roof

There was some serious discussion about the length of the over-hang on both the front & back of the roof. With a 3 foot over hang on the short side it will protect the blueberry bushes from most of the snow shed when it slides off. Any shorter, and they would have been direct targets.  In turn, that kept us from having to put bracing poles under the other side.

Once the framing was up, we started looking at the floor. The ground was pretty uneven and now that the walls were started, the tractor wouldn’t fit in to scrape it level.

A Little More Dirt

Bring in the sand! There is a big bank of sandy dirt part way down the road out to the woods. It’s naturally occurring, not something some one purchased or dumped. It works great as barn flooring. The milkers and kids have been using it for a few years and the drainage is great. Better yet, it’s free! The guys ran down and scooped a few loads while I finished supper. It certainly filled in the low spots and made the floor much easier to navigate.

Spreading It Around