A check in the barn turned up this limping beauty this afternoon. Nice job Errol!

Wound clipped to see damage

We have found all sorts of stuff that has worked its way up through the soil around here. I’m guessing we have some glass out there somewhere. We’ll keep looking for it.

Cut flushed

For a change I had the camera with me in the barn, so here is the way I treat a wound like this. First, I cleaned off the mud and clipped the hair back to find what the wound actually looked like. Then I cleaned the wound tract by irrigating it with hydrogen peroxide. In this type of case I have found it very helpful to have a squirt or spray bottle with the hydrogen peroxide in it. It has some pressure behind it to flush the dirt out of the cut.

Gauze packing

I wanted to keep the medicine in contact with the wound. I cut a 4×4 of gauze in half, folded that in quarters length-wise. I soaked it in the Schreiner’s herbal solution, and placed the gauze between the toes. I also flooded some of the Schreiner’s into the cut.

treatment plan

I cut a piece of 4″ wide vet wrap (self-adhesive bandage) to fit the bottom of the hoof. I pulled a length off the roll that would wrap around the hoof to secure it from dirt. I split the 4″ wide stuff in half to give me two lengths. When using vet-wrap you need to make sure you don’t wrap it too tightly and cut off circulation. If you are a ‘puller’, wrap a few of your fingers under the bandage and then remove them, that will give some breathing room.

vet-wrapped just tight enough to keep out debris

Wrap the bandage so that you catch the edges of the bottom piece. This wrap isn’t for support, but to keep bedding and other debris out of the wound. It just has to be snug enough to hold together.

trailer first aid kit

This is also a good time to talk about an emergency kit for the barn/trailer. This one is a hardware cinch sack. I store it in a recycled laundry soap bucket with other emergency supplies. These are actually designed to stack in a round, 5 gallon bucket. With the exception of the warm water & hydrogen peroxide, everything I needed to treat this cut was in the bag. I thought I had a tube of hydrogen peroxide gel in there, but it was no where to be found.

I’ll be replacing the gauze pads and rolls of vet wrap, topping off the liquid soap, and adding the H2O2 to refresh the kit. These buckets are kept near the barn doors, so in the event of an emergency, I can load them in the trailer quickly.

She also received a dose of tetanus anti-toxin, since it was about a year ago she had her shots and we haven’t given our boosters yet for the year. I don’t know exactly what cut her, so we are being cautious since I know she had mud and manure in it.

She’ll get this changed twice a day while it heals. I hope orange is her color!

My step-dad, not-so-subtly, hinted that he got cold while sitting in the chair during dialysis, and that it would be nice to have a blanket.

Basic Ship

Hint taken.

I mulled over several possibilities for patterns, but none of them really moved me to make them. I was flipping through an older quilting magazine I had checked out from the library and found a paper-pieced pattern for a ship. The ship looked more like a vintage steamer, but close enough to a tug or side profile of a short-bodied freighter. I enlarged it from about 4 inches square and then had to figure out a setting for it.

I decided on the Storm at Sea setting. This meant I had to turn the pattern to rest ‘on-point’ to fit the pattern. So a bit more re-designing was necessary to keep the integrity of the final design motion.

Coast Guard Ship

Since I couldn’t leave well enough alone, I thought a couple of Coast Guard cutters (or my version of them) would be appropriate additions. Especially considering his service before his career as a longshoreman. They are as close as I could come to rendering them accurately in fabric. Just for fun I added some of the fabric with the octopi in it. I also named the two cutters the USCG Coleman & the USCG Emily M. I figured he could use the laugh at the octopi trying to get the ships and the mental hug from us when he sat under it.

This is a pretty bad photo of the top before it was quilted and bound. The finished piece is layered with Warm & White and backed with light blue flannel. It is considered a lap quilt, but for it’s size it’s pretty heavy. (This is what happens when you are trying to take photos at night when you are Night Owl quilting! Perhaps I’ll get a better shot of it one of these days when the sun is up and Dad is holding it.}

Ship Shape

I do hope he liked it. His only comment I heard was, “I’d hate to get blood on it.” To which I replied “It is washable and I made it for you to use.” I haven’t heard any more about it. I did notice that it wasn’t laying on the rocking chair where it landed after we opened gifts on Christmas morning.

I hope he is using it and that it brings him warmth & comfort as we meant it to.

The buck barn has been finished for a few months. OK, almost 6 months. I obviously neglected to post the final installment in the saga.

Siding in Progress

The metal was all repurposed from either the shop or the barn builds. We had mostly grey siding to work with. We certainly tried to use that first, and on the sides that would be the most easily viewed from the house. Three of the four sides are indeed grey, and keep some continuity with the rest of the outbuildings. The half wall is made up of the tan colored pieces that the metal company used to protect the grey when strapping it down for shipping. It works great, and I seriously doubt that the neighbors are going to care that they get to look at the tan side, if they can even see it through the trees.

Scrappy Siding

The inside was a bit of a design challenge when it came to the hay feeder. The feeders in the Retirement Home and the Milker Barn are the slatted jobs to reduce hay wastage. The buck necks are much thicker. The danger of having their heads stuck between the slats and their pen-mates deciding to take a cheap shot is pretty high. We modified the feeder to have horizontal slats to prevent the boys from just coming over the hay box. We installed a salt & mineral feeder on the inside edge of the hay box. The boys don’t seem to mess with it like they did the one mounted to the wall.

Buck barn feeder/storage

The front of the building can hold a dozen bales of hay. We did add the section of cattle panel to keep the goats from leaning over the half wall and helping themselves to the hay quite so easily.  A grain bin and the dog food bin fill out the space. This set up makes it very easy for anyone to feed the boys no matter what time of the year that it is. Once the bucks are busy with the grain in the hay feeder you can slip in and feed the dog without getting funky. Eventually we will have a separate entrance to the chicken coop so we don’t have to access the coop only through the buck pen.

We will finish insulating the walls this spring/summer. I will say that the next one we build will have the roof insulation installed before the metal goes on. The condensation on the ceiling makes it rain inside when the wind blows. It ought to help with the heat in the summer too.

The guys installed an outlet for the electric fence charger and a light socket. The light has been very nice on the dark days of winter. We left the floor as dirt for better drainage. The one drawback with the dirt floor is the Anatolian Shepherd Livestock Guardian Dog. He likes to dig a nest. We’ve come in to feed him, and nearly fallen into the sleeping pit that he dug next to the gate!

Ed & Cute 1/3/15

The boys seem pretty happy with their new digs. Edvard, the Saanen buckling, will be reintroduced to the pen in a few weeks. He was a scraper, but with Wynton, Cute, and Otis in there, he was getting the short end of the hay feeder. Seeing as he was still a kid, we pulled him out and let him test the middle pen. It is where we transition the keeper kids from the indoor pen to being outside. Once they are tall enough to get their heads in and out of the big hay feeder on their own, we put them out with the big girls.

The timing of the construction of Buckingham was spot on. During one of our windstorms this fall, the old buck shack fell over! All but one of the posts had been destroyed by termites. I was so glad to not have to be out there trying to make some emergency repairs in nasty weather. (Been there. Done that!)

 

2014 Christmas Wreath

Merry Christmas from our family to yours!

Well. It certainly appears that I have been otherwise engaged for a few months! I promise to post the finished pictures of Buckingham in the next few days. Let’s just say the boys are really glad that it is up, as the buck shack actually fell over in a wind storm.

We have a new piece of technology here in the house. This little blue wonder is allowing us greater access to the internet and making posting to the blog so much more simple. It was taking me 30 to 60 minutes to upload a photo and often resulted in me getting bounced off the internet several times. (Edit: I typed this before I actually tried to upload photos here. It was much more simple to upload them to the quilting forum though. I’m sure it will get better with more practice!)

I love you all, but it was taking more time than I had to keep this blog up and running.

I’ll get this one posted as a sample run and then transfer the photos over that are needed to complete the buck hut saga.

Here is to a more connected 2015!

It was just too hot yesterday to get much done on the barn. It was 95º and the only flat place to cut the metal siding was in the full sun. In the interest of preserving my  husband from heat stroke. I made him quit.

Starting the Siding

He did get several pieces of the siding on. I washed them last night after it cooled down a bit.

Most of this building is being constructed from leftover materials from our other two big metal pole barns. Some of the metal pieces are pretty icky since they have been lying around for nearly 10 years. A little soap, water, and a broom took care of most of it.

The window was purchased from the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store and originally intended for the Milker Barn. The construction guys neglected to tell me that because the window frame shared the same support beam as the door jamb, I needed tempered glass for that window to pass inspection. Hence the boy’s lovely window.

If you are considering a building project, the Re-Store can be a good place to find items. Remember to take your exact measurements and a tape measure with you. Get all of the specifications for the materials you will need, as they don’t take returns.

Monday morning Cody had stopped by work and picked up the couple of boards we were missing for the end caps. That guy is going to need to get a pick-up truck one of these days!

Unofficial HD Delivery Vehicle

The crew was caffeinated and blueberry muffinated by the time I left for work.

The Smell of Sawdust in the Morning

As I was leaving they were cutting the spanner pieces for the roof framing. They had also decided to take hints from the construction of the big barn on how the ends and edges have been finished.

Raise the Roof!

When I returned home from work this is what I saw. The roof was on. The door had been built and hung. The window was framed in, and they were just putting on the door handle. Kind of.

They really wanted to use the shed antler we found in the woods, but thought they had better get final approval before they did.

It’s a buck hut. How could I say no?

Door Handle

The construction day started a little later on Sunday and it was interrupted by a few rain delays. An unused water tank works great as a compressor rain hat.

Rain Delay

After the first one it became humid and we lost the breeze for a while. Ugh. At least we managed to stay productive during the time outs. During the first one, the guys fished out the lumber from the rafters of the milker barn for the roof. During the second, we had lunch. By the end of the day they had gotten the walls framed in and the rafters up on the beams. Moving on to the Roof

There was some serious discussion about the length of the over-hang on both the front & back of the roof. With a 3 foot over hang on the short side it will protect the blueberry bushes from most of the snow shed when it slides off. Any shorter, and they would have been direct targets.  In turn, that kept us from having to put bracing poles under the other side.

Once the framing was up, we started looking at the floor. The ground was pretty uneven and now that the walls were started, the tractor wouldn’t fit in to scrape it level.

A Little More Dirt

Bring in the sand! There is a big bank of sandy dirt part way down the road out to the woods. It’s naturally occurring, not something some one purchased or dumped. It works great as barn flooring. The milkers and kids have been using it for a few years and the drainage is great. Better yet, it’s free! The guys ran down and scooped a few loads while I finished supper. It certainly filled in the low spots and made the floor much easier to navigate.

Spreading It Around

While I was up in Port Angeles running a verification test for Lucky Star Farm, this was going on at home.

Digging In

Em & Dad made the run to the lumber store for the framing timbers and other essentials this morning. Cody had the day off and came over in the afternoon to lend Dad a hand digging holes and setting posts.

Beam Me Up!

Apparently some of the holes had to be re-dug because of some plumbing pipes. Thankfully none of the pipes were cracked/broken to create a new lawn irrigation system during the digging!

I am impressed with the string system to keep everything close to square. (Well, as square as it can be with a LaMancha wether plucking at it.)

Men At Work

The guys were setting in the last post about the time I got home. This building will be closer to square and plumb than anything else we have built ourselves so far.

I heard rumors that the work crew will be back tomorrow afternoon for the next stage of construction.

In order to give us some room to build the new buck fortress palace, we needed to move a few fence lines around. The boys needed to stay secure at the same time, since we didn’t want to spend the better part of the day chasing them back home.

Fence Line Shifting

We had an old chain link kennel that we used if we needed to keep one of the animals separate for a few minutes. We expanded it and are using it as part of a temporary fence and the entrance gate. Once we had the front fenced off, the Anatolian wasn’t too sure about the new pen. It was a lot smaller than he liked and it made him a bit nervous. He pretty much gave in once the back part of the old fence came down and he had access to about three times the amount of space.

Rotten Fence Post

This is one of the corner posts we put in 10 years ago. It was just part of a fir tree that we cut into logs to use as fence posts. The fence panels were only things that were holding it up! The chickens are having a field day picking the rotten log apart and snacking on the grubs!

Construction Area Clear

Here it is all ready for the next phase. I think Eric will bring in the tractor and try to level out the ground as much as possible. There are some pretty good ruts along the former fence lines. I’m thinking about ways to mitigate that problem for next fall. I am looking at installing some of that weed block type fabric and then covering it with gravel around the areas that will get the most traffic. It looks like it does a pretty good job around the high traffic areas in horse stables. I’m all for avoiding large mud holes if I can.

Otis, King of the Spool

While we still have plenty of work to do, Otis is enjoying the new pasture space and a new spool. You can see the line in the grass in front of the spool where the old fence came out.

The two Old Girls get a spacious shed and pasture. The Milkers get the new barn with a nice-sized pasture and access to the woods. What do the Boys get?

Buck Shanty

A run down shack tucked under a fir tree. And that has been pretty much torn apart by a horned meat goat who was a previous inhabitant. Actually, that stupid goat did more damage to buildings and fences in his year here than all of the rest of the boys combined have done in 11 years. He was a stupid animal. He stood and whacked his head on the fence pole for hours day after day.

Anyhow, I digress.

It is time to bring the boys up to the standard of living that they would like to become accustomed to. First things first. Enlarge their pasture to the back perimeter fence, nearly tripling the size. Upgrade the separating fence to cattle panels to keep them on their side. (Very important during breeding season!)

Beginning of Buck Fencing

This is the progress we made for the day. Eric got the poles dug and set. We installed the new fence panels.

The deconstruction of the current isolation/boarding/holding pen is underway. It will be rebuilt with slightly different dimensions once the new buck barn is built. We did manage to get all of the 2×4 kennel mesh fence down and out of there tonight. Somebody put A LOT of wire twists on there to keep it securely affixed to the other fencing.

Tomorrow is more fence fiddling for the continued containment of the boys and dog during this adventure. I’ll keep you posted!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.